Macro

Global equities rebounded strongly last week, reflecting ongoing hopes of a US interest rate cut and signs that US trade tensions with Mexico at least would soon be resolved. And sure enough, Trump suspended planned tariffs on Mexico overnight following an apparent agreement to tackle illegal immigration. Sadly, the situation... Show More

Macro

A resumption of US-China trade tensions saw global equities pull back in May, with the MSCI All-Country World Index declining by 5.7% in local currency terms. As seen in the chart below, this continues the broadly choppy performance of equity markets since early 2018, reflecting the interaction of slowing global... Show More

Macro

Weekly comment Global trade tensions continued to dominate market sentiment over the past week, with bond yields and equities prices dropping further. Oil prices also fell while currencies remained steady and gold benefited from a flight to safety. Iron-ore also continued to impress, despite the trade wars. The focus of market attention... Show More

Macro

Week in Review The escalation in US-China trade tensions continued to dominate global market sentiment last week, with bond yields dropping lower and equities prices generally pulling back. That said, the fallout from the escalation in trade measures has been contained by continual US assurances that talks are ongoing and a... Show More

Global equities were on the defensive last week reflecting rising trade tensions and a higher than expected US wage outcome. Contrary to hopes, no US-Canada trade deal was announced and instead Trump ratcheted up the trade angst by threatening more tariffs on China and hinting his next focus could be... Show More

It was another positive week for global equities, with sentiment particularly buoyed by a US-Mexico trade deal. Sentiment eased somewhat by week’s end, however, given America’s negotiations with both Canada and China remained unresolved. In fact, Trump ended the week threatening to impose tariffs on another $200 billion of Chinese... Show More

The key global highlight last week was the fact that Wall Street managed to touch new record highs on the back of reassuring comments from the Federal Reserve. Indeed, the S&P 500 lifted 0.9% last week, helped by a 0.6% rise on Friday following a speech by Fed chair Jerome... Show More

The key global highlight last week was the fact that Wall Street managed to touch new record highs on the back of reassuring comments from the Federal Reserve. Indeed, the S&P 500 lifted 0.9% last week, helped by a 0.6% rise on Friday following a speech by Fed chair Jerome... Show More

Turkey dominated the headlines for much of last week, with the fall out spilling over into emerging markets. But the big news was late in the week with the announcement that China and the US would hold trade talks in Washington this week, which saw the the S&P 500 end... Show More

It was a mixed week for global markets with lingering optimism over the US economy tempered by concerns surrounding emerging markets in the wake of financial volatility in Russia and Turkey. US sanctions have unnerved investors in these markets, culminating in Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan even cajoling his citizens to... Show More

I'll keep it simple.. on historic mortgage affordability measures Sydney had become and still is just way too expensive ...and that's before the RBA lifts rates.. .I foresee sluggish price weakness for several years to come...

On Is it time to buy Sydney property? -

As you note, the MorningStar Institutional Survey excludes active performance fees, which may well eat up most of that marginal out performance by the 'average' manager. The survey also does not appear to allow for survivorship bias - i.e. under performing managers exiting before the 10-year period ends. The result seems great but defies most other financial research evidence, including S&P's SPIVA survey.

On Why active management works in Australia -

Hi Jerome. Thanks for reading my post but I think you miss the whole point of index investing. The core produces asset class "beta" returns and so is cheap as it does not try to generate alpha returns. It is hardly "risky" or "sub-optimal". If you know a great alpha fund that more than makes up for its (assumed) higher fees through higher returns then good luck to you.. but the evidence suggests most can't do that consistently..

On Blending active and passive: Analysing the key benefits of core/satellite investing -

Thanks for your comments and passing on your research finding. As you say I am sure there are a few fundies that can outperform over time.and a few strategies they seem to work . but finding them and sticking with them is hard as even they may go through periods of under performance. In general, everyone can't beat the market! Cheers David

On Thoughts on the Active vs Passive Debate -