David Sokulsky

2017 has been an excellent year for investors, with returns outperforming expectations and risk events fizzling out, despite their potential for disruption. The pick-up in global growth, improved global corporate earnings, deleveraging in Europe, and the promise of US fiscal reform have been some of the key drivers of this.... Show More

David Sokulsky

The political environment is arguably more important now for investors than it has been for many years. Trump’s presidential victory in the US, the rise of ‘populism’ in Europe, and potentially more regulation for domestic energy, healthcare and banking sectors all have the potential to impact markets. Show More

David Sokulsky

We believe that global diversification should be at the core of each investor’s strategy. A globally diversified portfolio is likely to be better positioned to weather large movements in markets, and provide a more stable set of returns over time. However, one of the implications of a globally diversified portfolio... Show More

David Sokulsky

As markets have now enjoyed strong performance over the last 12 months, and appear to be pricing in much of the good news, we thought that now would be a good time to report on the state of play in markets. We look at the factors that are likely to... Show More

David Sokulsky

Irrational decisions, going all-in or all-out, a home country bias… There comes a time when too much information is a bad thing, especially when it influences the way we invest. As the new financial year gets underway, we look at some of the most popular mistakes investors are making in... Show More

David Sokulsky

The debate surrounding active versus passive investing has raged on for over four decades, yet remains unresolved. This is because the focus has been on a binary conclusion—absolute active or absolute passive. In this article, we discuss the key points in the debate—but more importantly, we offer some thinking as... Show More

David Sokulsky

In the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), the traditional method of lowering interest rates failed to promote meaningful growth or inflation. This prompted several major central banks, including the US Federal Reserve (Fed), to undertake ‘extraordinary’ monetary policy measures to stimulate their economies. The effect of such an... Show More

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