Education
Dr Don Hamson

The ALP is proposing a raft of tax changes that will negatively impact after tax outcomes for many Australian investors should they be enacted. Arguably the most controversial is the removal of cash refunds of franking credits which we have written extensively on in 2018, but they are also proposing... Show More

Equities
Alex Cowie

Equity indices everywhere were in the red last year, yet the three most tipped stocks from the 2018 Livewire reader survey, Afterpay Touch, CSL and BHP, all finished well in the black. They gained (excluding dividends) 107.7%, 31.0%, and 15.8% respectively, or 52% on average. While the order has changed,... Show More

Asset Allocation
Dr Don Hamson

Forecast for shares income, including from the banks, remains solid. For the “glass half empty” thinkers, there is plenty of bad news to focus on in 2019 – the Trump trade war, Brexit, falling house prices, the final report of the Financial Services Royal Commission, political risk and more. Show More

Expert Insights

Dr Don Hamson from Plato Investment Management is always on the lookout for the best income opportunities from equities. His research suggests that there has been a 40% increase year on year for the dividends being paid out from the resources sector. "One of the reasons why commodities are doing well... Show More

Podcasts

Bill Shorten caused quite a stir last week as Labor proposed a policy of removing the cash refunds for franking credits that some investors currently receive. While the changes affect a relatively small number of people compared to the broad Australian taxation system, it’s hard to ignore the serious impact... Show More

Dr Don Hamson

When I was first asked to comment about the ALP’s proposed scrapping of franking credit refunds my response was I was “flabbergasted”. “Flabbergasted” that the party whose Treasurer Paul Keating created franking credits would cut those benefits accruing to retired workers, “flabbergasted” that the Leader of ALP Opposition who earns... Show More

Hi Bob The $5,000 number was an average, assuming one held only around 30% of $1m in Australian shares. As stated investors like yourself with higher allocations to Australian shares would clearly be worse off. $21,000 in your case is a lot to lose and shows how unfair this proposal is. Don

On Robbing Granny in the name of Paul -