The top five characteristics of 'Super investors'

Lachlan Hughes

Earlier this year I reviewed my top ten investment books of all time on Livewire. My goal was to share some of the perspectives of the world’s best investors. In this wire, I summarise those reviews to identify the top five characteristics of the world's best investors, the 'Super investors'. Show More

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Book Number 3 - Margin of Safety by Seth Klarman (Revised May 18)

Lachlan Hughes

Seth Klarman is widely recognised as one of the greatest value investors of all time. He is CEO and Portfolio Manager of the Baupost Group, a hedge fund managing over US$31 billion. His book, Margin of Safety is a value investors’ classic. Klarman practically explains the philosophy of value investing... Show More

Book Number 4 – The Most Important Thing by Howard Marks (Revised May 18)

Lachlan Hughes

Howard Marks is the Chairman and Founder of Oaktree Capital Management, an investment firm managing over $120B. This is not a how to invest book and you will not find any step by step instruction. When it comes to investing, Marks believes there is no sure-fire recipe for success. This... Show More

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Book Number 6 – The Little Book of Value Investing by Christopher Browne (Revised May 18)

Lachlan Hughes

Today I review the investment classic authored by Christopher Browne, ‘The Little Book of Value Investing’. Browne was a partner at Tweedy, Browne Company – the oldest value investing house on Wall Street. Again, I recommend reading the book in its entirety. However, here are my favourite chapters. Show More

Book Number 7 – The Great Crash 1929 by John K. Galbraith (Revised May 18)

Lachlan Hughes

Originally published in 1955, The Great Crash 1929, provides a timeless reminder of the economic consequences of financial speculation, excess leverage, and herding. Many parallels can be drawn between The Great Crash of 1929 and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. There are moments in this book where you may... Show More

Book Number 8 – Common Stocks & Uncommon Profits by Philip A. Fisher (Revised May 18)

Lachlan Hughes

Warren Buffett once described himself as being 85% Ben Graham and 15% Phil Fisher. If Ben Graham is the father of value investing, Phil Fisher is the father of growth investing. The primary difference between the two philosophies is clear. Ben Graham’s investments tend to benefit from a one-time profit.... Show More

Book Number 10 - You Can Be a Stock Market Genius by Joel Greenblatt of Gotham Capital (Revised May 18) 

Lachlan Hughes

Over the next ten days, I will review and post my top 10 investing books of all time - starting with number 10. I hope you enjoy the reviews and they provide you with some new perspectives that improve your investing. This book is a must read for any keen... Show More

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Clear Sky ahead for Catapult

Lachlan Hughes

Just a sensor stitched into a shirt? Well, not quite. Catapult provides sophisticated analysis to help understand player load with a view to preventing soft tissue injury. The technology also assists team management understand their players bio-mechanics in an objective way. The real smarts are in the algorithms that process... Show More

Empired: Winning in the New World

Lachlan Hughes

Coming off a record FY15 result Empired (ASX:EPD) carries solid earnings momentum into FY16. On the back of several acquisitions it is now positioned as one of Australia’s leading providers of IT services and infrastructure. Sustainability of its earnings have improved dramatically through diversification of operations both geographically and by... Show More

Hi Damien. I think we could. We need our politicians to create a law that the company (acting on behalf of its shareholders) can claw back any entitlements i.e. salary or bonus, for unscrupulous behaviour. I think that would produce a positive change.

On The top five characteristics of 'Super investors' -

@Adrian Thanks for your question Adrian. You raise an important point. Best practice is to accrue the performance fee daily, crystallise annually (subject to beating index) and apply a high water mark. The accrual ensures new investors aren’t being penalised for prior performance. This is important. However, it doesn’t help existing unit holders, who would have still paid a fee in my example.

On The dirty secrets fund managers don’t want you to know! -