Investors are understandably feeling jittery about the stock market after landing in bear market territory this month, following a very volatile January, with global markets shaking on concerns of Chinese economic growth and, once again, the liquidity of global banks. But this hasn’t stopped companies from accessing public capital markets in Australia. Already this year, several companies have gone to the capital markets to source funds for business expansion – in contrast to the US where not a single company went public in January, the quietest January since 2011. Only four biotech companies have floated as at mid-February. The poor performance of many issues in 2015 and the technology sell-off has reportedly weighed on US IPO activity this year. In Australia, IPO investment returns fared very well last year. According to analysis of Dealogic data by OnMarket, the average return of the 93 companies that listed on the ASX in 2015 was 23 per cent by the year’s end. Continue Reading: <a href="http://snip.ly/tammq" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-event-type="click" data-event="link_click">(VIEW LINK)</a>

Investors are understandably feeling jittery about the stock market after landing in bear market territory this month, following a very volatile January, with global markets shaking on concerns of Chinese economic growth and, once again, the liquidity of global banks.
But this hasn’t stopped companies from accessing public capital markets in Australia.
Already this year, several companies have gone to the capital markets to source funds for business expansion – in contrast to the US where not a single company went public in January, the quietest January since 2011.
Only four biotech companies have floated as at mid-February. The poor performance of many issues in 2015 and the technology sell-off has reportedly weighed on US IPO activity this year.
In Australia, IPO investment returns fared very well last year. According to analysis of Dealogic data by OnMarket, the average return of the 93 companies that listed on the ASX in 2015 was 23 per cent by the year’s end.  Continue Reading: (VIEW LINK)



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Steve Johnson

The big issue with these statistics is that they should be weighted by accessibility. Did you try and get some Baby Bunting? Sealink perhaps? These offerings - which were clearly attractive investments - were massively scaled back (I'm talking 99%). So if you apply for every float, you will get lots of stock in the duds and almost nothing in the good ones. The average investor's return is not going to be anything like the average float return.