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Saul Eslake

Here are ten things that I think will shape the global and Australian economies in 2018, and that expect I’ll be talking about at conferences and events over the course of the coming year. Show More

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Sam Ferraro

A number of popular scapegoats emerged in the aftermath of the financial crisis: conflicted credit rating agencies, a corporate culture and regulatory environment that encouraged risk taking over risk management, lax lending standards, rapid growth in credit, and what some considered to be excessively loose monetary policy from the U.S.... Show More

Vimal Gor

Just as the markets had convinced themselves they were in for an uneventful carryharvesting summer, something started to change at the end of the month, with central bank communication seemingly dominating economic data with respect to their impact on market moves. Whilst the theme of disinflation continued to play out... Show More

David Sokulsky

In the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), the traditional method of lowering interest rates failed to promote meaningful growth or inflation. This prompted several major central banks, including the US Federal Reserve (Fed), to undertake ‘extraordinary’ monetary policy measures to stimulate their economies. The effect of such an... Show More