quantatative easing

Tony Sutton

Quantitative easing (QE) is the process by which central banks inject money directly into the financial system, usually through the purchase of government bonds using printed or electronically created money. This is intended to stimulate economic activity. Show More

Brett Gillespie

There was much fanfare on the 22nd May 1994 when millionaire Japanese dentist Akihiro Kabe and co-driver Takeshi Okano approached the start of Australia’s inaugural Cannonball run in a $750,000 Ferrari F40. At the time the most expensive new Ferrari in the world, it was about to tackle Darwin to... Show More

Fixed Income
Livewire Exclusive

Bonds are typically viewed as a defensive component of an investor's portfolio. They tend to perform best when your riskier assets are doing poorly. Stuart Dear, Deputy Head of Fixed Income at Schroders says the analysis they've conducted shows this relationship has held true in all but one circumstance over... Show More

Nikko Asset Management Australia

Speaking at a news conference after the Federal Open Market Committee meeting, US Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen stated that ‘helicopter money’ could be considered under certain conditions. In Japan, with currency intervention effectively off the table for fear of accusations of being a currency manipulator, there is increasing speculation... Show More

Livewire News

Morgan Stanley's Global Economist Manoj Pradhan has warned there is a chance that the US, Europe and Japan will all commence tightening at the same time next year, should there be a substantial pickup in growth and inflation. Pradhan says "What is unknown is whether the economic situation will pan... Show More

Livewire News

"Since 2008, high yield debt has gone from $300 billion to $900 billion. This is but one side effect of QE which has forced sovereign bond yields into negative real territory and sent yield hungry investors into the high yield market. While investors, mutual funds in particular, have been scrambling... Show More